We All Share the Same Nature

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Last month I talked about the essence of the nature of who we are.  Who are we? We are: Sat Chit Ananda (‘Absolute Bliss Consciousness’).  This is the Self.  We share this nature with all living beings: whether we are human, a cow, a dog or a fish. We all share this common nature of the Self.  As we start to recognise our shared nature with all sentient beings, we start to realise the importance of Ahimsa (non harming).  As living beings we have two main goals in life: to be happy and to avoid suffering.  We share this goal … Read More

The Fifth Yama: Aparigraha (non-coveting)

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To refresh, the five yamas (codes of conduct) of Patanjali’s Eight Fold Path are: Ahimsa (non-aggression or non-violence) Satyam (truthfulness) Asteya (non-stealing) Brahmacharya (continence) Aparigraha (non-coveting).  We previously looked at the fourth yama – Brahmacharya (continence).  Now, let’s explore the fifth yama – aparigraha in more detail.  Focus: APARIGRAHA Aparigraha is often interpreted as non-greed or non-coveting.  It is the abstention from possessiveness, greed, selfishness and acquisitiveness. Aparigraha is about accepting what one has and being mindful when giving and receiving.  In our contemporary consumerist society, this concept of simple living is a difficult one for many to grasp especially … Read More

The Fourth Yama: Brahmacharya (Continence)

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To refresh from last month, the five yamas (codes of conduct) of Patanjali’s Eight Fold Path are: Ahimsa (non-aggression or non-violence) Satyam (truthfulness) Asteya (non-stealing) Brahmacharya (continence) Aparigraha (non-coveting). Last month, we looked at the third yama – Asteya (non-stealing).  This month, let’s explore the fourth yama – brahmachharya in more detail.  This month’s focus: BRAHMACHARYA Brahmacharya is keeping control of one’s desires, particularly sexual ones.  It is chastity of word, thought and deed.  One who practices brahmacharya is said to be one whose mind is always fixed on the divine Being to achieve purity of heart.  Attachment to sensual … Read More

The Third Yama: Asteya (Non Stealing)

GraceGrace's Blog

To refresh from last month, the five yamas (codes of conduct) of Patanjali’s Eight Fold Path are: Ahimsa (non-aggression or non-violence) Satyam (truthfulness) Asteya (non-stealing) Brahmacharya (continence) Aparigraha (non-coveting). Last month, we looked at the second yama – Satyam (truthfulness).  This month, let’s explore the third yama – asteya in more detail.  This month’s focus: ASTEYA Asteya means non-stealing and it is not simply about abstaining from theft; but in addition it is about not coveting more than your minimum needs.  One must remember that nothing in this world is a personal possession; we merely borrow what we need.  Taking … Read More

The Second Yama: Satyam (Truthfulness)

GraceGrace's Blog

To refresh from last month, the five yamas (codes of conduct) of Patanjali’s Eight Fold Path are: Ahimsa (non-aggression or non-violence) Satyam (truthfulness) Asteya (non-stealing) Brahmacharya (continence) Aparigraha (non-coveting). Last month, we looked at the first yama – Ahimsa (non-violence).  This month, let’s explore the second yama – satyam in more detail.  This month’s focus: SATYAM Satyam is truthfulness.  It refers to truthfulness in action, word and thought.  By making the heart and the lips the same in conformity with the facts, one creates an atmosphere of truthfulness.  There should be no split in personality – the yogi should be … Read More

The First limb of Patanjali’s Eight Fold Path: YAMA

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Last month, we looked generally at Patanjali’s Eight Fold Path, where the practice of yoga as a spiritual discipline is organised into eight limbs or parts.  The Eight limbs are: Yama (restraint) Niyama (observances) Asana (posture) Pranayama (breath control) Pratyahara (controlling the senses) Dharana (concentration) Dhyana (meditation) Samadhi (absolute consciousness) Each month, we will take a close look at each ‘limb’ and highlight the emphasis and expressions provided by them. This month’s focus: YAMA Patanjali stipulates yama as the universal social discipline, the great commandment that transcends all ages, creeds, country and time. The term yama can have different interpretations; … Read More